Novarica Council Gathers Insurer CIOs to Address The First Year of the Future

Matthew Josefowicz

Nearly 70 IT leaders from more than 50 insurers gathered last week at the 9th Annual Novarica Insurance Technology Research Council Meeting to participate in panels and workshop sessions with their peers, get insights from Novarica’s senior team, and attend keynote sessions from outside experts on operational transparency and cyber-security.

The First Year of the Future

We dubbed last year “The Year the Future Arrived” for insurance, when nascent trends like wearables, Internet of Things, consumer internet giants’ interest in the sector, and a growth of direct sales beyond personal lines became a reality. This year, the clock is no longer counting down, but counting forward.

Keynote: Nine Trends and Issues…

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My keynote focused on our Novarica Nine for 2016 and Beyond, looking how these and other trends are shaping the industry, as well as what kinds of technology strategies insurers are taking to address these trends, and how they are managing their IT organizations to deliver these capabilities.

…100 Technology-Enabled Capabilities

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We also reviewed our expanded “Benchmarking the New Normal” framework, which we will publish this summer, looking at deployment rates for 100 key technology-enabled capabilities across functional areas like product, marketing, distribution, customer engagement, billing, claims, and finance/operations and technology areas like data, digital, and core.

CIO Panel: Core, Agile, Evolving Customer and Employee Dynamics

Our CIO Panel, which included Kate Miller of Unum, Scott McClintock of OneBeacon, and Paul Brady of Arbellla, addressed strategic issues ranging from core systems replacement to embracing agile development to redesigning their organizations to make insurance IT an attractive career option for millennials.

Operational Transparency for External and Internal Customers

Our guest keynote, associate professor Ryan Buell of Harvard Business School, presented his research on operational transparency and its impact on customer service to a tremendously responsive and engaged group. We’d invited Dr. Buell to join us because his research is so applicable not just to the insurance customer experience, but to the relationship between IT and other business units. See this recent post for more on this session

Novarica Research on Core Transformation, Data, Digital

On the second day, the Novarica panel of Rob McIsaac, Martina Conlon, Mitch Wein, and Jeff Goldberg from our team discussed some of their recent research and customer projects in areas like core systems selection, transformation project assurance, data strategy, meeting agents’ digital needs, and a wide range of other trends and best practices.

Discussion Groups of CIO Members Focus on Their Key Issues

Special interest group discussions for group voluntary benefits, individual annuities, individual life, personal lines, specialty, commercial lines, and workers comp explored recent research relevant to each sector. In discussions co-led by a Novarica expert and a CIO chairperson, these groups addressed topics like enrollment standards, impact of the DOL fiduciary ruling, market dynamic changes, ISO rating, and core systems vendors.

Cyber-Security Threat Evolution and Preparation

Distinguished professor and Department of State cyber-security adviser Dr. John Savage gave a closing keynote on the cyber-security, emphasizing the importance of managing security beyond perimeter protection and staying engaged with industry groups to monitor the evolution of new threats globally.

Knowledge-Sharing and Networking

novarica-councilCouncil members valued the opportunity to network and learn from each other in a private, vendor-free environment, and many of the special interest groups have already made plans to meet again later this year. We’ll be publishing a report summarizing the discussions and panels next month, and the 10th Annual meeting will occur in late April, 2017.

For more information on joining the Council, senior insurer IT executives are invited to visit http://novarica.com/council and request membership. Membership is free and has no obligations.

Policy Admin, Corporate Governance, and Disrupted Distribution

Matthew Josefowicz

Policy administration system replacement and evaluation activity is at an all-time high across the industry. Across both life/annuity and property/casualty, policy administration systems vendors are offering suites that include not just traditional policy and rating functions, but billing, claims, portals, documents, and business intelligence capabilities.

Yesterday, we published our 2016 Novarica Market Navigator on P/C PAS solutions (complementing the LHA edition published last month). This report covers more than 50 vendor solutions, with individual profiles averaging more 10 pages, providing detailed information on the functionality of all of the sub-components on the system. These reports also include single-page executive summaries for each vendor.

Together, they provide more than 900 pages of research on these important vendors. Jeff Goldberg and Tom Benton will review and discuss this research in a webinar on Wednesday at noon.

Large strategic projects like policy administration system replacement highlight the importance of corporate governance when it comes to technology strategy. According to our recent research, 89% of insurer CIOs say their board members don’t know the right questions to ask about technology, and end up overfocusing on risks rather than opportunities. Frank Petersmark and I will discuss this on a webinar on March 28.

Life and retirement board members will have a lot to think about as the new DOL regulations take effect, requiring sellers of retirement products to act as buyer fiduciaries, and completely disrupting distribution in this marketplace. Several large insurers have cited this change as the reason for divesting their distribution arms, and more change is afoot. Rob McIsaac has been discussing this with our annuity and retirement Council members, and shares his thoughts in a new executive brief.

Policy Administration Systems: A Gateway to the Future

Rob McIsaac

With a rapidly changing and fragmenting market place for insurance, core replacement is becoming increasingly essential the L/H/A space.  Updating of legacy systems is important for capabilities like customer experience, BI/analytics, and product innovation which become key differentiators in an increasingly competitive, and transparent, world.

In response, vendors for L/H/A policy administration systems are offering more options for implementation to lower risk and cost. However, so many options can make the selection process seem daunting.  Our most recent Novarica Market Navigator report provides an unparalleled 284 pages of detail about the current market and the vendors in it.

When selecting a solutions provider for a policy administration system, there are a number of factors that carriers need to consider. A well-developed system should integrate downstream and back office systems. It can support either single or multiple lines of business, and it may also interface with single or multiple distribution channels. The system may also offer a suite of capabilities, and if it doesn’t, it should be designed to interface with solutions providing those other mission critical capabilities.

The future has arrived, and L/H/A carriers have renewed their focus on policy administration system replacement in 2016.  Although there are many factors and options to consider the reality is that carriers across most lines of business now are recognizing that the technical platforms that have served them well in the past simply lack the flexibility or capacity to deal with an evolving economic environment.  This new Market Navigator report can be a “must read” for those developing strategic plans for the future.

Related Reports

  • Life/Health/Annuity Policy Administration Systems 2016
  • Consider the Future when Evaluating Today’s Insurance Systems

    Chuck Ruzicka

    Over the past few years, I’ve worked with many insurers on core policy administration vendor selection, and I’m excited to have joined a team with so much existing experience in this area.

    While most selection processes focus heavily on features, configuration tools, architecture and implementation methodology, it is equally important to understand the vendor’s upgrade process and history. Since business needs and technology continue to change rapidly, a key selection factor for a vendor partner is their ability to evolve to support tomorrow’s needs, and not just today’s.

    One predictor of the future is the vendor’s record for helping customers migrate to newer versions of their software. The decision to upgrade can be impacted by factors outside the control of the solution provider such as:

    • Business priorities like entering new states, deploying new products or an acquisition
    • Budget constraints due to poor underwriting results
    • Complexity of multi-year implementation of business transformation projects

    Regardless of these external factors, upgrades are most likely to be dependent on the vendor itself. In Novarica’s most recent Property/Casualty PAS Market Navigator report, one key difference that emerged between solution providers was the percentage of current clients on versions of systems that were three years old or older. The reasons for these vendor solution differences should be investigated and assessed as part of the software evaluation process. Prospective clients should consider the following:

    1. Value of roadmap items. Does the vendor’s solution roadmap suggest enough new capabilities or improvements with each upgrade to warrant implementation? Well-architected and mature systems may have much of the desired functionality and integration capabilities such that upgrading becomes less important. Even if this is the case, this difference is still relevant due to changes in infrastructure components and the risk of technological obsolescence. Ease in upgrading is more critical if a vendor is catching up or building out new competitive capabilities.
    2. Solution provider release strategy. Some solution providers incorporate all minor releases into the scope of their implementation projects. Others hold back release updates until the system is fully implemented. What is the impact of delaying the incorporation of new functionality during the implementation? Competitors who have already implemented a new system may be leveraging those new roadmap features before you complete your initial implementation.
    3. Velocity of change. Frequent and material releases will drive a higher need for related regression testing capabilities and possible infrastructure upgrades. How will your organization respond to those demands? How will your QA organization manage release (regression) testing along with functionality testing?
    4. Upgrade accelerators. Does the solution provider offer adequate guidance regarding how to configure and manage the system to facilitate future upgrades? Do they have the tools and a proven methodology to make this process easier and less painful?
    5. Upgrade barriers. Potential clients should ask longer term clients either why they haven’t upgraded versions in several years or conversely, what did it take to implement the most recent upgrade. Project team size, duration, challenges and available assistance should be understood. While it is always useful to talk to new clients about methodology, new features and configuration tools, existing clients should also be contacted.
    6. Impact of configuration upgrades. If solution providers have improvements to their configuration tools in their roadmaps, be sure to ask if products implemented in prior versions will automatically roll forward or if a conversion effort is required. You may be surprised by the answer.
    7. Value of more frequent upgrades in a managed service agreement. An additional consideration is whether or not you will get earlier benefits realization from a managed service agreement. SaaS installations tend to be on more current versions of the software. If your organization does not have a disciplined program for upgrading software components, you may benefit from a SaaS implementation.
    8. Selection criteria weights. Given all that you learned by considering the prior seven items, should your selection criteria weighting be altered? Does it give enough weight to differences in upgradeability?

    No one wants to be buying a system that will become out of date and require a large scale replacement project in the near future. One way to avoid this is to purchase a system from a solution provider that invests in the future and has a clear and cost effective methodology for managing software upgrades.

    Please don’t hesitate to contact me at cruzicka@novarica.com to learn more about our policy administration and other core system vendor selection services. You can also check out:

    Top Technology Priorities for Personal Lines Carriers

    Jeff Goldberg

    Today’s personal lines marketplace is more competitive than ever due to slow growth, intense price competition and customer acquisition costs rising.

    Personal Lines insurers have always been a leader in insurance technology innovation and conversations with CIOs and research in the space shows that trend will continue, with technology playing an ever-larger role in insurers’ ability to attract, retain, and profitably serve clients. Across the industry, insurers continue to make investments across the Novarica Insurance Core Systems Map.

    Novarica Insurance Core Systems Map: Personal Lines

    Novarica Insurance Core Systems Map: Personal Lines

    In a market with very competitive conditions and intense profitability pressures, personal lines carriers are focusing on growth strategies, expense reduction, and improving underwriting results. Below I have listed four technology priorities CIOs and business executives should consider to remain competitive.

    Business Intelligence
    A data quality initiative, which examines data warehousing, operational data stores, and appropriate data marts, is key before undertaking more advanced business analytics initiatives. Once data quality is ensured, carriers can then overlay business intelligence tools. Predictive analytics tools for carriers with sufficient data are becoming more popular. Small carriers should look at working with an organization that can provide pooled data and insights. All carriers can use models to improve underwriting insights, to more consistently apply pricing, and to improve claims activities. In addition, third party big-data sources are going to become more and more prevalent for personal lines insurers. Companies who take advantage of this first will have an edge in pricing and retaining business.

    Policy Administration Systems
    Upgrades to policy admin systems will help carriers gain operational efficiencies and flexibility in the ability to add data. Using business rules to manage workflow and predictive analytics to build pricing models can improve risk selection, risk pricing, and reduce operating expenses. Carriers should look for highly configurable solutions with product configurators, simple rules, and tools for launching new rating algorithms. They should also look for the ability for business units to make their own modifications, though practical experience with configurable systems reveals IT often still ends up managing most changes. As long as the time and cost of such work for IT is reduced, that’s still a big value.

    Agent Connectivity
    Extending functionality to the agents continues to rise in importance. It’s less and less about differentiation and more and more simply the price to pay to be in the game. At this point in time, most personal lines insurers have built an agent portal, and are often quite proud of the results. As a next step, both agents and carriers would prefer to receive and provide information electronically and process that information with as little human touch as possible, eliminating double entry. Real-time upload, download, and data translation deliver tangible benefits including reduced costs of handling, improved data quality, and improved turnaround time.

    Claims Management
    Streamlining claims management by automating processes improves customer service by speeding up claims service, providing consistent and fair best practices to all customers, and delivering personal service. On top of these customer benefits, insurers who have implemented modern claims systems report tangible speed-to-market benefits. If a carrier hasn’t already begun to upgrade their claims administration system, now is the time to start. Carriers who are using modern systems are rapidly gaining competitive advantages by improved efficiencies in claims handling and improved data leading to better outcome management. In addition, better claims processing has become a significant part of how personal lines insurers market themselves to consumers and how consumers select an insurer.

    These technology priorities are based on the expertise of Novarica’s staff, conversations with members of the Novarica Insurance Technology Research Council, and a review of secondary published resources. For more information, download a free preview of our new Business and Technology Trends: Personal Lines report at: http://novarica.com/business-and-technology-trends-personal-lines/ or email me to set up a complimentary 30 minute consultation.

    Related Reports

    Trends in P/C and L/H/A Policy Administration Systems for 2015

    Martina Conlon

    In Novarica’s US Insurer IT Budgets and Projects 2015 report, survey data showed that nearly 40% of Property & Casualty and Life/Health/Annuity carriers are currently replacing or planning to replace a policy administration system.

    Core-Policy-Administration-Replacement-Chart

    There are various reasons why P/C and L/H/A insurers are focusing their efforts on replacing policy administration systems, including:

    • The need to improve product development speed — and enhance product capability—to pursue new opportunities, or to accommodate market demands
    • The need to improve product development flexibility to enter profitable new niches whether in Life or P&C.
    • The need to attract and retain not just top producers, but also the new generation of producers who won’t stand for the challenges presented by legacy solutions.
    • A desire to find more cost-effective ways to support the ongoing operation and management of core-systems capabilities and reduce the sizeable costs associated with simply keeping legacy systems on aging brittle, platforms.
    • A desire to real-time processing, increase automation and gain internal efficiencies
    • Increased data accessibility demands as business intelligence and data analytics become a significant part of insurers’ strategic objectives. In order to better set rates/pricing, reduce fraudulent claims, and generate other predictive models, core system data must be available for analysis, whether within the system or via export and transformation.

    Novarica’s recent research indicates that carriers continue to aggressively seek to replace their existing policy administration systems, or in some cases add a new system to the mix. The P/C policy administration market continues to flourish for those vendors with in-demand systems and reflects a number of trends most of which remain unchanged from last year.

    While sales of L/H/A core systems have continued to lag the pace of their P/C counterparts, the level of interest has steadily grown, and growth in sales of core systems is likely to follow. In fact, the pattern of investment profiles for L/H/A carriers is following a very similar path to what has already happened for P/C carriers, albeit at a somewhat delayed pace, undoubtedly a consequence of the relative risks associated with implementation and the challenges related to in-force block conversions.

    With a variety of vendor solutions available, choosing the right solution that best fits your needs can be a complex process. A great way to start is by checking out our latest Market Navigator Reports on Property/Casualty and Life/Health/Annuity, blog posts (links below), trends in policy administration webinar recording, as well as our vendor selection services.

    To learn more the latest policy administration trends or to see how Novarica can help you with your vendor selection project, contact me via email for a complimentary 30 minute consultation.

    Related Blogs

    Related Reports

    2015 Vendor Selection Best Practice for Insurance Carriers: Simplified vs Extensive RFI

    Martina Conlon

    In my last vendor selection blog post I highlighted a few best practices, one of which included using a simplified Request for Information (RFI) that was easy for the vendor to complete and for you to score. I’d like to delve into this topic more and explain why a simplified RFI can make or break the vendor selection process. A simplified RFI will get you through the vendor selection process much faster, and will help your selection team focus on what really matters – your unique requirements.

    From a functionality perspective, don’t inventory the ordinary; instead focus on areas that are specific to your business. We know that any insurance application that is in production with several insurers will support basic transactions. For example, all policy systems have a new business, policy change and cancellation transactions so there is no need to spend time and focus on them. Instead, dig into features that matter to your business. Perhaps you need robust premium audit features to support your workers comp business, or you need advanced reinsurance capabilities to support your middle market commercial business. Ask questions in the areas where you may be stretching the capabilities of a vended solution.

    Having been involved in over 50 vendor selection projects (rating, policy administration systems, claims, billing, agent portals, business intelligence, etc.), Novarica recommends that during the RFI phase the focus should be on discovering reasons not to consider a particular vendor (the “deal-killers”). Novarica’s experience has shown deal killers generally fall into one of four areas: Staff, Organization,Functionality, and Technology, easily remembered by the acronym SOFT.

    Staff

    • Do the staff have the right skills and experience?
    • How well are they likely to understand your needs?
    • What resources are available for implementation and support?
    • What assurances will you have that the staff you meet during the sales process will really be the staff that you work with?

    Organization

    • How stable is the organization?
    • Is it big enough for your company to do business with?
    • Is there a conflict in the company’s ownership (i.e., are they owned by a competitor)?
    • Who are their other clients?
    • How much of a role do clients have in product development?

    Functionality

    • Does the solution support the lines of business, states, and high-level functionality that you need?
    • Which functions are actually live at reference clients?

    Technology

    • Is the solution’s technical architecture compatible with your enterprise standards?
    • Does your IT staff have the skills to support it?

    The typical Novarica RFI includes 100-150 questions. The typical response for 30-50 pages takes 2-4 hours to score. Your time is valuable – don’t waste days reading and scoring complex RFI responses full of information you probably already know. This simplified approach will typically allow you to narrow the range of potential suppliers in any particular solution category to 2-3 candidates much more quickly and effectively than with a large dense RFP.

    For more information about vendor selection best practices, make sure to register for our upcoming Vendor Selection Best Practices webinar taking place Thursday, January 29th at 2 p.m. (ET) or send me a note at email.

    2015 Tech Trends: Thoughts for Insurance CIOs

    Tom Benton

    As I was preparing a blog post on technology trends for 2015, I came across Chris McMahon’s article in INN, “Top 5 Tech Trends for 2015”. The five he chose were: core systems modernization, analytics, mobile computing, the Internet of Things and the digital customer experience. These are certainly great choices, so here are some further thoughts on these trends and their impact on the insurance CIO.

    Core Systems
    As mentioned in the article, interest in core system modernization remains strong for 2015. A survey of Novarica’s Research Council members last year (with results presented for both P&C and LHA insurers) found that the trend is toward faster deployments via SaaS or hosted solutions using an iterative deployment approach. Vendors are developing track records of implementation completion and are finding ways to reduce the risks of these large implementations. CIOs who are considering core system replacements should get an update on potential vendors and their current offerings, and Novarica’s latest Market Navigator reports will be available in February for LHA and P&C policy admin system vendors. 2015 may be the year to consider a replacement and prepare using lessons learned from previous successful implementations at other insurers.

    Analytics
    Analytics continues to be a hot area of discussion at insurers. Novarica’s report “Big Data Technologies for Insurers” notes that insurers should focus on the need first, based on business demands and strategy, before investing in specific technologies. While there have been some initial uses of big data for analytics at insurance carriers, few have integrated analytics into core insurance processes like underwriting and claims. Insurance CIOs should work with business leaders to define a strategy and the “big questions” that need to be answered by improved analytics capabilities.

    Mobile Computing
    Novarica’s report on “US Insurer IT Budgets and Projects 2015” noted that mobile technology is still considered an “emerging technology” area at many carriers. Insurers are struggling to leverage the “3 C’s” of mobile technology (convenience, camera and coordinates) to provide better engagement with producers and customers. CIOs need to look beyond specific mobile strategy to consider flexibility of their systems for the next wave of mobile technologies, including wearable and Internet of Things, along with the analytic capabilities needed to leverage the data these systems will generate.

    Internet of Things
    Just as 2014 was the year of wearables as a consumer focus, 2015 promises to be the year of Internet of Things, including connected home products, drones and smart devices. The key for CIOs is considering what data from these devices can be leveraged for improved insurance products and operations. Information governance will be a key capability for 2015 and into the future.

    Digital Customer Experience
    Interest in engaging customers through digital technologies is driving insurers to reconsider their customer engagement and digital strategies. Novarica’s report “Preparing for Digital Transformation” provides a checklist that includes reviewing current capabilities, strengthening project prioritization and other best practices, and adopting an appropriate culture for transformation. Many customer-focused organizations outside of the insurance industry are creating Chief Digital Officer (CDO) roles to lead these efforts. In essence this move is to provide a focus for meeting the demand for improved customer engagement using technology tools. CIOs should consider taking the lead in efforts that a CDO role would address – CIOs with a good track record of meeting business needs through effective technology deployment should be in good position to do so.

    These five technology trends provide a good starting point for discussing your IT strategy for 2015. As always I welcome your feedback. To send me a note or set up a complimentary 1 hour consultation, contact me via email.

    Silicon Valley Ventures

    Rob McIsaac

    I recently had a chance to spend a week in the San Francisco Bay Area, which offered an opportunity to combine business and pleasure. My son and daughter in law are scientists working for startups, which gave us a chance to get better perspective on the elements driving the local economy. It also proved to be a bit of a dream trip for my “inner geek”, as we explore the history of Silicon Valley. What application do I see this having for insurance? Plenty it turns out.

    The Valley is a hotbed of activity and the path to getting from its birth to today is surprisingly clear. According to the California Historic Marker, the birthplace is actually at the garage where Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard began their famous collaboration. Their first major customer was Walt Disney and the garage is only a few blocks from Stanford University. HP was where Steve Wozniak worked when he and the other Steve began the Apple journey and the garage they worked in is a short hop from HP’s. There’s an energy in the air that recognizes and rewards both innovation and risk taking.

    Google is a short distance away, adjacent to Moffett Airfield, home of the Ames Research Lab (NASA) and the site of many aircraft innovations from the early part of the last century. This is also the home of the famous Hanger One, where the US Navy kept monster airships in the 1930′s. What do you do with an 80 year old building designed to house Zeppelins? Google is taking it over so they can fly things indoors, of course. And test self-driving cars with advanced features and capabilities away from prying eyes.

    For the better part of a century, the area has been a focal point for innovation and creativity. Each new advance and breakthrough is a combination of new ideas built out by the next generation of technologists on a foundation that was framed by those who went before them. The next innovative idea may come from a big company with a long track record of success or a small one that is scrambling in the same mode as Hewlett and Packard … or Jobs and Wozniak … or Brin and Page.

    In any case, people are surrounded by an environment of creativity, risk taking and a willingness to tackle big problems. Watching as an outsider from “back east” is engaging, particularly when you consider the financial, technical, educational and legal structures required to keep the engine of innovation running. There is clearly a case of a rising tide lifting all ships. If you want to see what the future may hold, visit The Valley.

    Clearly, some others are catching this message. Pharmaceutical companies are setting up and / or investing in research labs. Auto manufacturers are moving work into the area, with BMW now being one on Google’s new neighbors. At least one P&C carrier has an operation there, putting them in close proximity to leading edge thinking and access to technical resources. It turns out things like the application of Big Data Analytics are unencumbered by notions of industry specific barriers.

    Some remarkably innovative banks are also located in the same area. While my trip to Silicon Valley started as a family vacation, it became a thoughtful point of introspection on insurance.

    Seeing the interaction of business elements, combined with the life changes spawned by technology advances, calls into question the potential viability of legacy systems, operations and processes. While the changes may not happen with the flip of a switch, the best defense, as always, remain a good offense. The list of companies that failed to heed this advice reads like a roll call of spectacularly failed brands. Even recognizing that changes were coming, and in possession of capabilities that could have changed their trajectories, companies like Kodak and Polaroid and DEC (to name but three) found that they could not trade the comfort of the past for the potential of future success. This Success Trap issue is one that should be a point of concern for carriers, as they contemplate both the potential for new forms of competition and the demographic shifts now underway in traditional markets.

    Recognizing the value of the phrase “seeing is believing”, Novarica is in the early stages of planning a Research Council meeting to be held in Silicon Valley. We will be targeting mid-year for an event that promises to be both thought provoking and perspective expanding. To quote William Gibson, “the future is already here, it just isn’t evenly distributed”.

    For more information on the Silicon Valley meeting, drop me a note at email or give me a call.

    Baked Ham and How “Best Practices” Reflect the Best Available Technology…

    Rob McIsaac

    Both organizations and the people who comprise them are, to a significant degree, a function of their experiences. As time progresses we learn what works, and what doesn’t. We explore strategic alternatives and consider decisions which reflect an appropriate balance of risks and rewards in order to allow us to optimize results based on a specific set of criteria.

    Both insurance companies and their employees also learn from their mistakes. The corporate form of “don’t touch that stove” may actually tie to business ventures gone sideways, technical investments gone bad or M&A events that spectacularly failed to hit their mark. No matter what it is, these experiences inform future decisions unless (or until) they fade from the conscious memory.

    Of course these events have a corollary which focuses on what worked, and these “winning” strategies and tactics also form a foundation for future success. In fact, for many organizations, the past many times is deemed to be a predictor of the future, so long as it gets put into the right context. This also means being in a position to draw the correct lessons from past experience, and avoiding the temptation to confuse “correlation” with “causation”.

    The correct lesson extraction may, in fact, be the tricky part.

    I heard a story recently which brings home the point. In prep for a holiday dinner that involved a ham, a spouse noted that the ham had been cut in half before put in the oven. Why?

    “Because that’s what my mother did” came the reply. Asking the mother-in law-why she did it produced a similar, inter-generational,: “because that’s the way my mother did it”.

    Blessed with the opportunity to ask the grandmother-in-law why the ham was cut on half got to the root of the matter. And the response for the ages: “because my oven was too small for a full ham to fit!”

    Which gets back to many insurance carriers as they consider options for future business process changes and the technology investments, including core systems, that will support them. As carriers look to replace platforms from an earlier era, rather than focusing on what is possible to do with modern tools , they continue to plan for a world that was heavily informed by what worked in the past, failing to appreciate the limitations created by the environment of a different day. Rethinking business processes and related structures can dramatically improve operational and financial results, but not if they are arbitrarily constrained by legacy limitations.

    As carriers embark on technology stack replacements they need to understand their own half-a-ham stories and proactively work to explode them for the myths that they are. Getting outside of the company, perhaps outside of the industry, can be particularly helpful and instructive for CIO’s and their teams today. Last year, I had a chance to visit the BMW assembly plant in Greer, SC. This is an amazing facility that is essentially business process and industrial choreography on steroids. The last time I’d seen a plant like this was in the late 1960’s watching Chevys come down the line. This was like Star Wars (my new experience) meeting Charles Dickens (my recollection from a bygone era). It was hard to imagine that these were the same types of places.

    Building a state of the art, 21st century car, in a plant rooted in the lessons of Henry Ford, would be impossible. Insurance carriers face a similar dilemma as they get ready for a new and every more competitive environment. Game on!